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Department of Computer Science & Information Technology
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Science Center 202
912.344.2542
Department of Computer Science & Information Technology

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science


Computer science requires creativity, insights, background, and skill in problem solving, and this problem solving involves a mix of studying theoretical frameworks and practice. The major includes a core of courses designed to accomplish the following primary objectives:
: :    Have students be prepared for employment in business or industry in the wide variety of
        positions in which computer science is required.
: :    Have students be prepared to pursue graduate studies in computer science
        or a cognate field.
: :    Have students develop fundamental skills in computer science in order to be in a position
        to adapt to rapid technological changes involving computing.
: :    Have students develop an understanding of the algorithmic approach to problem solving,
        including the development, representation, communication, and evaluation of algorithms.

The major includes emphasis on two tracks: software or systems. The program is flexible, so students at the senior level are able to explore other areas of interest along with their track. We encourage our students to participate in undergraduate research or in sponsored projects under the guidance of a computer science faculty advisor.

The computer science degree is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). It was first accredited in 1991 and is presently one of the few accredited programs in the state.
 

Career Opportunities

We expect virtually all graduates of our program to immediately enter the computer science professions, or to be competitive in entering graduate school, and to enter the professions after completing graduate coursework. Professions in computer systems include software, hardware, people and data.

Software Systems
Computer scientists who work with software can be involved in the development of new software programs or in the maintenance of existing computer systems. In a small working group, one person may see a project through all phases of software development, from analyzing the need, to designing and coding the solution, to installing the end product for the user. In a large working group the tasks of analysis, design, implementation, testing and installation may be divided among many different people or teams that may be not be geographically co-located. Some computer scientists work in new areas of software capability, such as computational intelligence, robotics and haptics, while others are concerned with specialized software application in areas like embedded systems, Web programming, and computer graphics.

Hardware Systems
Although the task of designing new hardware systems typically falls to electrical engineers, the job of keeping computers, peripherals and networks running smoothly and efficiently falls to computer scientists. These computer scientists, often called system administrators or network administrators, become proficient in using and modifying the complicated system software that governs the behavior of computers and networks.

People and Data Systems
Entry-level computer jobs centered on people include positions that focus on sales and service of a particular product. In addition, there are an increasing number of positions for computer professionals who train the non-computer scientists of a company and provide support for a variety of software and hardware products for them. Later in a career, a computer scientist may hold a position focused on managing a number of other computer professionals. Jobs in data and information services as well as cyber security provide many new opportunities for computer scientists. With the rapid growth of the Internet, companies are recognizing the value of information and the challenge of retrieving and protecting pertinent information. A degree in computer science can be an important career starting as outlined in the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics biannual report.
 

Employers

Employers of Armstrong Atlantic's computer science graduates include: Apple Computer, Delta Airlines, Georgia Power, Hewlett Packard, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle Systems and Wal-Mart. Local employers include: Aelera, Verifone, Georgia Ports Authority, Gulfstream, International Paper, Memorial Medical Center, Prologic, Savannah Electric, Savannah Foods, City of Savannah, Savannah Labs, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography and Verisign.

 

Program Features and Facilities

Students in computer science at Armstrong Atlantic enjoy small classes that allow them to be known by name and valued as individuals. Discussion between faculty and students often spills over beyond the classroom. Once a week, students and faculty gather for a luncheon and a lecture or discussion during a colloquium on a topic of interest in computer science. Computer programming teams compete regularly in the ACM Intercollegiate Programming competition. Because Savannah serves as the business and manufacturing center for southeast Georgia, students can find educational work opportunities off campus, and our on-campus academic computing services also employs many students. A current list of jobs and internship opportunities is maintained at the Department of Computer Science's web site.

Computer science students have access to excellently equipped computing laboratories and daytime access to a multi-media classroom. Among the equipment found in these locations are personal computers running both the Windows and Linux operating systems. All of these machines are connected to a campus network to allow access to all campus servers and access to the Internet. AASU is also deploying a wireless network with student access.
 

Course of Study

Students must complete at least 54 hours in computer science courses. In addition, they complete five courses in mathematics, four science courses, and a course in technical writing. Precalculus is a prerequisite for taking the first course in the computer science major.